How understanding the Power Chakra can help your writing

image credit: soul-trees.com

image credit:
soul-trees.com

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the Root Chakra and the Sacral Chakra and how understanding them can help you understand your writing better.

This week, I’m writing about the third chakra, or the Power Chakra. Other names for this are the Personal Power Chakra and the Solar Plexus because it’s located in your solar plexus, just under your rib cage, in the center, in the vicinity of your upper abdomen.

As I’ve said in the past, the Writing Through the Body™ process has both generative and corrective benefits.

Remember that before we can approach the process as a generative tool, we have to have at least a vague idea of who we’re dealing with. In this case, let’s say a 15-year-old female.

Next, when we look at the Power Chakra elements, we can first go to the primary fears of this chakra. Starting here gives our character something to grapple with. We might decide to go with the Power Chakra fear that someone will discover her secret(s). This will help us begin to think about what secrets she might have. Maybe she just discovered she’s pregnant. Maybe she’s stealing money from her parents. Maybe she’s dating someone her parents wouldn’t approve of.

Any of these could be cause for stomach problems, a typical ailment associated with the Power Chakra, so we could give her that.

Because she’s withholding, she’s stifling the power of this chakra – her personal power. When we do this, it can draw up anger, so there could likely be an angry outburst in the story.

Over the course of the story, she can either address and transform the problem, or she can continue to keep it to herself. Either way, there’s a story here.

If you already know you have a 15-year-old girl who is stealing from her parents, but you aren’t sure where the story’s going, a brief look at the chakra elements, and you’ll know you’re dealing with a Power Chakra problem. You can then begin to think about the primary strengths of the chakra. Two are generosity and a strong sense of ethics. We at least know she’s not strong on ethics, and although we don’t know what she’s doing with the money, she may or may not be generous.

In considering these aspects of her character, we can begin to ask the all important question: “why?” This question is what drives story. Story is about cause and effect. It’s about decisions that lead to actions that lead to discoveries that lead to more decisions, and on and on…

By consulting the Power Chakra and understanding its elements and getting the character moving around, by making her visible, we can then delve a little deeper into her characterization and her motivations.

This is how story unfolds.

Why do you think she’s doing what she’s doing?

Third Chakra – Personal Power Chakra – Personal Power

Yesterday, I wrote about the Sacral Chakra and how it can inform our writing in terms of our own or our characters’ identities in relation to another person. Today, I’m writing about the third chakra, the Personal Power Chakra.

The Personal Power Chakra relates to a physical form of power, just as the first and second chakras have. The first chakra was about the power of the tribe, and the second chakra was about the power between us and other individuals. The third chakra is about our personal power in relation to the outside world, and it bridges the physical experience and the emotional experience. In essence, it’s about the process of individuation and becoming our own selves.

Having a strong Personal Power chakra allows us to be capable of translating our intentions and desires into manifestation. Sometimes, the only way to individuate is to leave others behind.

Below is a brief explanation of the Personal Power Chakra and some ways we might integrate its attributes into our writing.

Third Chakra – Personal Power ChakraYellow Sphere1

Location
Solar Plexus, between the navel and center breastbone

Primary strengths
Self-esteem, self-respect, self-discipline, ambition, ability to handle crisis and take action, generosity and strength of character, courage to take risks, free will

Primary fears
Rejection, criticism, anything related to body image, that others will discover our secrets

Positive manifestations
Ability to channel powerful emotions such as anger, toward positive means

Negative manifestations
Blind rage and destructive anger

Lesson
Balance between taking control and letting go

Aspects we might consider for our characters or ourselves
Level of self-esteem and self-respect, fears around rejection and criticism

 

Try the following meditation and exercise, and let me know what you come up with.
Feel free to post it below this post, or email me at:  johnnie@johnniemazzocco.com.

 

Meditation
Close your eyes and do a short visualization of the Personal Power Chakra: A yellow, pulsating orb in your solar plexus, between your navel and breastbone. Imagine it expanding and contracting and spreading out to your sides. Sit with this pulsating, optimistic, confident energy for as long as you can, breathing deeply, for 5-10 breaths. Count to ten slowly on both the inhale and the exhale for each one. When you’re ready, let the energy begin to recede and return to its original size. Maintain its presence in your body as you open your eyes and begin the following writing exercise.

Writing Exercise
Fiction Writers
Think of the two characters you’ve been working with recently, or create two new ones. One is the protagonist. The other is the antagonist. These two characters are at odds with each other in some way. This can be blatant conflict, or it can be subtle. Think about how willful or passive each character is. What is the protagonist’s goal or intention, and how does the antagonist interfere with it? Get them involved in a dialogue about the conflict. Their conversation can be direct (discussing the issue at hand openly) or indirect (beating around the bush / being somewhat passive or manipulative).

Creative Non-fiction Writers / Memoirists
Pick an action you want to take but have been putting off.
What are your deepest passions/desires? What do you want to accomplish?
Which of the following describes your feelings around your desires?
– Fearful or anxious?
– Confident and self-assured?
– Sarcastic or pessimistic?
– Wise and clear-minded?
– Over-analytical?
– Curious?
– Alert or foggy?
– Good-humored?
How does your tribe or a person figure in to your feelings around achieving your desires?
What are you going to do about it?

 

Sending you mad writing mojo…

Johnnie
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