Author Interview – Ulrick Casimir

What compelled you to tell the story/stories in your most recent book?
This is a great question, but it has like ten different answers, since each piece compelled me in different ways, and at times those ways overlapped.  Sometimes—like with “Stars of Gold,” “Phantom Power,” “I Love You, Joe,” “Marvin’s Dilemma,” and “Urania’s Mirror”—what compelled me most was the exploration of perspectives that are dramatically different from my own, which is something that I tend to value greatly in my fiction writing.  At other times, like with “Children of the Night” and “Phantom Power,” it was my long-running interest in exploring the potentialities of literary noir that truly compelled me to develop and flesh out those stories the way that I did … and the same goes for the collection’s closing story, “Urania’s Mirror,” which is about as much “sci-fi” as it is “tech noir.”  “Many Happy Returns” was compelling to write mostly because it’s such a large noir-ish sweep of a story, and it’s so much about interior and exterior landscapes, that the thing really opened up like a large flower, letting me dance with some of the well-established conventions of the short-story genre in a single piece. But one major thing that often compels me to tell specific stories (and that certainly girds the stories in this collection) is an overriding concern with a sense of “place,” which often expresses itself in terms of “belonging”:  Some of the pieces in the collection (e.g., “Just Like Me” and “Urania’s Mirror”) are deliberately vague in terms of setting, while others (such as “Many Happy Returns,” “Phantom Power,” and “I Love You, Joe”) are far more specific about setting … but almost all of these pieces show characters struggling, in some way, with community and belonging.  So perhaps it’s the difficulties that come with “being where we are” that most compelled me to write the pieces in this collection.

What obstacles did you encounter while writing the book?
I think for most writers the most significant obstacle to their writing is time and space.  I’m deeply fortunate to have friends and family who are generous enough to allow me the time and space it takes to draft and render, to revise and proofread—and since the collection’s publication, I’ve been busy reconnecting with my friends and family, in a concerted effort to show them just how much I’ve appreciated their patience with me.  I learned, long ago, that writing can feel like a disappearing act to those around you, which can be a major obstacle if you’re a (semi) social person who’s neck-deep in drafting and revising and proofreading.  Work, too, that thing you do to keep bread on the table, can make things difficult … though I thank my lucky stars, every day, that teaching college and university classes offers a tremendous amount of flexibility to my schedule.

How has writing your most recent book changed or added value to your life?
One really rewarding aspect of drafting this book was how it raised my level of confidence and command in storytelling.  MFA’ers are taught in a way that leads us to focus intensely on one story at a time, but with this collection, precisely because I wanted a sort of thematic unity with the stories that it contains, I had to revise and proofread them all simultaneously.  It was a bit like holding several conversations in your head all at the same time, and it was the wildest, most freeing and pleasantly dislocating experience of my creative life.  Honestly, I cannot wait to feel it again.

Did you self-publish or did you go the traditional route? What was that process like?
Corpus Callosum is the publisher of this collection—so no, I did not self-publish.  I guess the publication of this collection would qualify as “the traditional route” … though to be honest, since this is my first book, I don’t really have another route to compare it to.  One of the most exciting aspects of this process is that Corpus Callosum is a new literary press that launched with my book:  My publisher and editor, Eric Tucker, who is also the editor of Plainsongs literary magazine, is someone I’ve known for quite a while, and he is very familiar with my fiction writing (in fact, he picked “Stars of Gold” to move Plainsongs, which had a long-standing reputation as a poetry magazine, into the inclusion of short fiction pieces).  Trust and a critical eye are two things that I deeply value in an editor … and I lucked out, frankly, with Eric.  Lots of ins and outs of the publication process, and he has been there to patiently help me through it all.

Are you friends with other writers? If so, how do they influence your writing?
I am indeed friends with other writers.  Sometimes their work influences me, while at other times, they help me as critical-yet-encouraging readers of my work, and in those instances, it is their editorial commentary that truly influences me.  Some writers, like the fine young poets Terry Kennedy and Julie Funderburk, I’m influenced by them from afar even though I’ve known them since my MFA days.  There are few things like seeing great writers who you went to school with find success; this can be powerful motivation on those dark days when writing is hardest.  There are some more local writers who influence me as readers—and I’m afraid that they are quite literally my secret weapon, so I won’t be naming them anytime soon.  🙂  I should note, though, that there are many writers who I’m not friends with but whose writing influences me deeply—Donald Pollock, Megan Abbott, and Wells Tower are among them.

Do you maintain a regular writing practice? If so, what does it look like?
I do maintain a regular writing practice, but I’ve learned over the years that writing can take on many different forms, which is to say that what’s regular for me might seem quite … irregular to someone else.  For me, it’s all about figuring out ways to “hack” my life in order to include writing most firmly within it, and in as many ways as possible.  A good example would be “Phantom Power”:  That story came to me late at night and very quickly, in a burst that I captured as quickly as possible in a notes app on my phone—and this happened while I was in the middle of revising an earlier draft of “Many Happy Returns.”  Capturing stories like this, jotting them down before I start plotting them out, lets me sift through story ideas later on, when I’m looking for something promising in order to start the next stage:  loose planning, which is especially vital for me later on while drafting and rendering.  Without that loose plotting/planning, drafting and rendering slow down to a painful crawl for me, becoming more mechanical and less artful, like building skin and then trying to slip the bones underneath.  Normally, I try to draft and render one piece at a time.  Depending on what I’m working on, I can revise and proof one piece or many pieces at the same time.  Now, if you atomize that process, you start to get a sense of my writing practice.  For me, life as a fiction writer is all about being productive.  I focus a lot less on a specific number of hours, or pages, per day than on fully integrating my writing practice(s) into my life and lifestyle—this lets me work gradually while staying productive.  I’m not sure if that way of writing work for everyone, but I can tell you that this personalized practice of mine places much less stress on me as a writer.

How many other books or stories do you have in progress right now?
So I literally have hundreds of stories jotted down (!!), but if you’re asking about work that’s more realized, I have a couple of stories in progress at the moment, one of which will appear in this summer’s volume of Plainsongs magazine.  As far as the next book … this is a funny story (at least it’s funny to me!!) but one of the most frustrating/pleasant things that happened while I was writing Children of the Night:  Stories was the discovery that two stories that I was frantically revising to include in the collection simply weren’t “fitting” with what I had envisioned thematically for the volume.  It wasn’t until after I cast them aside that I realized both would benefit from elongation … and the two were speaking not only to one another but also speaking to another piece whose story I’d already jotted down (but I had yet to plot out or start drafting).  All of this basically meant that right as I was proofreading my first book, I suddenly discovered I’d started working on the next one.  With any luck, I’ll have that next one drafted by mid- to late 2019.

Do you view writing as a spiritual practice?
This is a great question—I don’t know about “spiritual,” but I do think of writing as an intensely psychological practice, in that it helps the writer make sense of the world, which automatically gives writing a kind of sociological dimension or “thrust” as well.  For me, the purpose of reading is to place yourself in someone else’s perspective, which is one major reason that I see fiction writing as a game of perspectives—if you as an author aren’t inside of your character, if you aren’t sympathizing with them and seeing the world as they do, then you’ve lost the game as well as your reader.  If there is a global spirit, then I figure it must exist not within but between us—and in that way, yes, I do think fiction writing takes on a spiritual dimension.

What would your life look like if you didn’t write?
Honestly, I’m not even sure how to imagine my life without writing.  To me, writing isn’t something that you do—being a writer isn’t a choice, it’s just who you are.  Take away my laptop, stick me on a desert island with nothing but the clothes on my back, and watch how quickly I find a fallen palm frond and start scratching out passages on the beach.  If you’re an artist, then you paint because you must; if you’re a writer, then you write because you have to.  I literally can’t imagine my life without writing.  Hell, I don’t even want to.

Why do you write?
Great question—I write to make sense of the world; I write because I have to.

Ulrick Casimir lives, writes, and teaches in the Pacific Northwest.  He earned a B.A. from North Carolina State University and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; he also holds an M.A. and a Ph.D., both in English, from the University of Oregon, where he teaches. Ulrick‘s scholarly writing has appeared in the film journal Jump Cut, and his short stories have frequently appeared in Plainsongs literary magazine.  Published by Corpus Callosum Press, Ulrick‘s debut short-story collection, Children of the Night:  Stories, appeared this spring.

Author Interview – Jeff Stookey

What compelled you to tell the story/stories in your most recent book?

“Compelled” is an interesting word. Its roots mean “to drive together.” For me the word “urge” feels more accurate in describing how I began.

I have long loved word origins. It has always struck me that the English word “poet” derives from a Greek work for “maker.” Merriam-Webster adds that it is akin to a Sanskrit word for “he gathers, heaps up.” Again, “to drive together.” And the English word “art” derives from Latin “art-” and “ars” and is related to “armen” meaning arms, weapons, tools; akin to Latin ars (art, skill, craft, power), Greek harmos joint, arariskein to fit. Hence our word “articulate” or join together. Art joins things together.

As a child, I became captivated by anything to do with art. My grandmother had a lot of art books with images of old paintings that fascinated me, and I liked drawing pictures. Later in school when I learned to read and we were assigned to write stories for class, I was intrigued by making up narratives and by the way you could make characters talk on the page by putting quotation marks around their words. Movies and television, of course, entranced me and aroused my interest in, not so much storytelling, as creating feelings and moods. I loved the scary, the creepy, the mysterious, and The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and Thriller were favorite shows. Later I grew interested in works that evoked tears, pathos, sympathy, longing, compassion.

I became obsessed with movies and filmmaking for many years, and I did make a few short films. But the process of making films was too cumbersome. Then in the 1980s I read The Color Purple, which I loved, but the movie was a tremendous disappointment. This turned me in the direction of books and writing. It seemed to me that one could do much more and go much deeper in a book than in a movie.

When I turned 50 in 1998, I still wanted to do some kind of creative work (the urge), and I had it in my head that I had survived long enough to have something to say in writing about this life and this world we live in. I sat down to write about my father and about my friend, Steven “Jesse” Bernstein, a Seattle writer who committed suicide in 1991.

But this image came into my mind: two men necking in a 1920s automobile in a rural setting. The image haunted me and I began examining it and wondering who these two fellows were, what their background was, how did they meet, what was their relationship, what happened to them? The more I delved into these questions, and the more I wrote, the more curious I became. As the story unfolded I was driven on by the opportunity to use this story to portray the pain of growing up gay and the struggle to come to terms with that reality in a sexually repressive society dominated by heterosexuality. As I learned more and more about gay history, the history of Portland and Oregon, the history of the Ku Klux Klan, the eugenics movement, etc., I felt compelled to share this history with readers. This led to the three novels that make up my Medicine for the Blues trilogy. And with the rise of Donald Trump, I felt that it was important to publish and get this story out to the public with hopes of encouraging compassion and understanding for those who are different.

What obstacles did you encounter while writing the book?

I saw that I had to better understand history, in particular, what it was like to be gay in the 1920s. This was a major obstacle. First I ran across John Loughery’s book The Other Side of Silence, men’s lives and gay identities: a twentieth-century history. Eventually, I encountered the writings of Jonathan Ned Katz, and others: George Chauncey, Peter Boag, George Painter, and many more. The deeper I dug, the more I found and the more that came out in publication after I started writing. This created another obstacle, which was trying to keep up with all the literature on gay history and theory that was becoming available.

How has writing your most recent book changed or added value to your life?

All this reading in LGBT history opened up a whole new world for me. It was not just Socrates, the Greeks, Michelangelo, Walt Whitman, and Oscar Wilde, who were examples of what it meant to be gay, but there were many men, known and unknown, who over the years had experimented with, experienced, and thought about making gay lives for themselves and others like them. There were legions of people validating and supporting my identity as a gay man.

Did you self-publish or did you go the traditional route? What was that process like?

I am a self-published author. I pitched my book to several agents at the Willamette Writers Conference. A number of them expressed interest but told me that my book was too long to be published as one book. Yet none of them followed up after I sent them samples of my work.

I decided that I had put too much work into this project to let it languish in a drawer, only to be found after I died—like the memoirs of my main character, Carl Holman. I asked around about editors and a friend told me about Jill Kelly, PhD. I contacted her and after some preliminary interactions, we began working on my manuscript. Jill had self-published some nonfiction and a few novels of her own, and she guided me through the process of dealing with Amazon’s Createspace and Kindle Direct Publishing. She knew the ropes.

Are you friends with other writers? If so, how do they influence your writing?

I am an introvert and like to stay home most of the time, so I can’t say I know a lot of writers. I have some old, old friends that I see from time to time, who have kept writing over the years. I was in a writing group several years ago and I’ve reconnected with one of those folks recently. Since I published, I’ve met a few other local writers at various readings and other literary events, and those encounters have grown into developing friendships. Plus, I have been involved with a new writing group over the past six months and those writers, besides becoming friends, have been teaching me a great deal, not only by the example of their writing, but by pointing out some of my bad writing habits.

Do you maintain a regular writing practice? If so, what does it look like?

When I was first writing Medicine for the Blues trilogy, I was still employed and I would get up at 3 or 4 in the morning and write for an hour before I went to work. Now that I am retired, I write when I don’t have other obligations, so my writing is not so regimented. I do like the weeks and days when I don’t have other things to attend to and I can plan to spend the whole day writing. Lately, I’ve been working on revisions to Book 3 of the trilogy and I find that revisions require a lot of concentration over a period of time, because there are so many things to juggle. I sometimes spend 8 to 10 hours a day writing. Other days I can’t find any time to write.

I’ve been going to a Monday morning writing group at the Q Center where we get prompts and write whatever comes to mind over 10 to 15 minutes, then we share what we’ve come up with. It’s not only great fun but a powerful stimulant to the imagination and a laboratory for experimentation. From this experience, I’ve got lots of new material that I hope to develop in the future.

The other aspect of my writing practice is my formal writing group which meets every two weeks. That gives us all a deadline and an impetus to get something ready for the others to read before we meet. Then we gather and share our thoughts on what the others have written.

While I am writing, I like to do a lot of research, and that always stimulates my imagination for filling in scenes and scenarios and gives me ideas about how to accurately describe historical times and details. I use the dictionary and thesaurus a lot to find just the right word or the right shade of meaning. In every paragraph, I probably look up 2 to 3 words, or more.

How many other books or stories do you have in progress right now?

I have a couple of ideas that are on the back burner of my mind right now, not things I have actually written down. Besides those, there is the material from the Q Center writing group. I look forward to mining that treasure trove for further development, once the third book of the trilogy is finished. I guess I prefer to tackle one project at a time.

Do you view writing as a spiritual practice?

Yes, to some extent. Writing is a voyage of discovery. The imagination is a conduit for the universe to work through us, and the intuitions and coincidences that happen in the process of writing can be quite awe-inspiring. But there is a Buddhist scripture which refers to “the dharma of thusness” by saying, “Just to portray it in literary form is to stain it with defilement.” Much of the spiritual world is beyond words. On the other hand, Gertrude Stein once said that the only things worth doing are impossible things. Spirituality is an unfolding. Maybe writing can help it along. Compassion is certainly a spiritual practice, and putting ourselves in the shoes of others, characters different from ourselves, helps us develop understanding and sympathetic feelings.

What would your life look like if you didn’t write?

I have always felt an uneasy relationship with writing. Although I wrote when I was younger, I had lots of self-doubts restarting at 50. I felt intimidated, I wondered what gave me the right to think I was a writer. Then once I was immersed in this trilogy, I came to understand what George Orwell meant when he wrote, “Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle like a long bout with some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” (The antidote for this viewpoint is Elizabeth Gilbert’s book Big Magic.) And now that my book is in print, I am plagued by the whole endeavor of publishing and marketing.

My life would be a lot simpler if I didn’t write. But then I would still feel that urge to create something, and digital words or marks on paper, are a lot more manageable physically than drawings and paintings—another creative outlet I sometimes contemplate pursuing.

I look forward to spending more time gardening, once I complete this trilogy. Then I hope to have more breathing room to entertain thoughts of plunging into another big project.

Why do you write?

See Question #1.


Growing up in a small town in rural Washington State, Jeff Stookey enjoyed writing stories. He studied literature, history, and cinema at Occidental College, and then got a BFA in Theater from Fort Wright College. In his 40s he retrained in the medical field and worked for many years with pathologists, trauma surgeons, and emergency room reports.

Jeff lives in Portland, Oregon, with his longtime partner, Ken, and their unruly garden. Acquaintance is his first novel. Contact Jeff at medicinefortheblues.com.

Author Interview – Curtis C. Chen

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

Deadlines are a thing now, and I appreciate the motivation and focus they provide. Also, my process has become much more collaborative–not just with publishing professionals like my agent and various editors, but also with fellow writers and even readers. (I don’t look at any reviews unless someone has pre-screened the content for me, but having a sense of how people are responding to my stories does inform my future work.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

A lot! I’ve been doing National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) since the early 2000’s, and because the goal is to produce 50,000 words in 30 days, I’ve accumulated several partial or unpolished first drafts. Most of those will never see the light of day, but each one has helped me work through different challenges and become a better writer.

Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice? Why or why not?

Absolutely. I subscribe to Elizabeth Gilbert’s philosophy (as detailed in her book Big Magic) that a creative endeavor should be rewarding in itself, ars-gratia-artis style. Any subsequent “success”–fortune, fame, or even just getting published–may be a result of doing the work, but those things should not be the goal of the creative act. If you’re not enjoying the journey, maybe seek a different path.

How many hours a day do you write?

It varies, but when I sit down to write I aim for a solid block of at least two or three hours. It always takes a little while for me to get into the flow of the work, and once I’m there I want to preserve it for a good length of time so I can dig deeper into the project.

What are your favorite literary journals?

In no particular order…

What is the most difficult part of your creative process?

Finding the time to schedule writing into the rest of my life. I don’t have a day job at the moment, but I do a lot of freelance and volunteer work. It can sometimes feel selfish to schedule uninterrupted writing time when people are waiting on me to complete other tasks. It’s all about being disciplined, and I’m still working on improving my time management.

Do you believe in writer’s block? Why or why not?

I don’t experience it myself, but I recognize that different people encounter different obstacles when trying to channel creative energies. Ultimately every writer has a different process, and it’s taken me many years to figure out what works for me. I would encourage trying out different tools, environments, and communities to find what really energizes you to create.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

I’ve written complete first drafts (~100,000 words) in less than two months, but the revision time after that varies a lot. I’m largely a discovery writer, which means I don’t plan or outline much before diving into that first draft, and I have to go back and clean things up later. My debut novel took ten years from first draft to publication; my second took ten months; and the third one in progress has been going for about a year and a half so far. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? 

I am fortunate to live in an area with many awesome independent creators, and I’ve met and befriended a lot of writers in and around Portland, Oregon. I’ve also made connections through conventions, workshops, and online forums over the years. Please check the acknowledgments section in each of my novels to see some of those names. 😉

What are the most important magazines for writers to subscribe to?

As a speculative fiction writer, I live and die by my Locus subscription ( https://locusmag.com/ ). There are many ways to get information online these days–including following your favorite authors on Twitter–but two in particular that I recommend are author Jason Sanford’s Patreon ( https://www.patreon.com/jasonsanford ), where he posts a weekly “Genre Gossip” column, and the free SFWA Blog ( http://www.sfwa.org/blogs/sfwa-blog/ ), which covers a wide range of writing, publishing, and community topics. (Full disclosure: I am the current Secretary of SFWA and a former contributor to the blog.)


Once a Silicon Valley software engineer, CURTIS C. CHEN (陳致宇) now writes fiction and runs puzzle games near Portland, Oregon. His debut novel WAYPOINT KANGAROO is a science fiction thriller about a superpowered spy facing his toughest mission yet: vacation. The sequel, KANGAROO TOO, sends our hero to the Moon.

Curtis’ stories have appeared in Playboy Magazine, Daily Science Fiction, and OREGON READS ALOUD. He is a graduate of Clarion West and Viable Paradise.

Visit him online: https://curtiscchen.com

Author Interview – Gina Mulligan

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

For the first novel I didn’t use an outline. I wrote a full draft before stepping back to consider the storyline. That’s when I realized how much longer and more difficult I’d made the editing process. For the second novel, I developed a detailed outline and then wrote my draft. Much easier!  

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?  

Four.

Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice? Why or why not?

The act of being creative is innately human and often feels spiritual. There’s a transcendent element to the work when I finish writing a section, review it, and it feel like it was written by someone else.

How many hours a day do you write?

I write about 5 hours, 3-4 days a week. I don’t write daily because I also run a charity.

What are your favorite literary journals?

The Atlantic
The Kenyon Review
I don’t read a lot of journals because I spend more time reading books – both fiction and non-fiction.

What is the most difficult part of your creative process?

I really struggle with the first draft. Story development is a challenge for me. Plus, I love to edit. Once I have a draft done, I’m ready to dive in.

Do you believe in writer’s block? Why or why not?

No, but some days are harder than others. I don’t see this as writer’s block as much as times when I’m distracted or can’t concentrate as I’d like. It’s frustrating when I just don’t know why I can’t put a sentence together. Days where the words just flow are much more fun.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

About two years.

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer? 

I love the writing community in Sacramento and have many writer friends and supportive acquaintances. In particular, I work with three talented women in a critique group. We review each other’s drafts, give feedback, commiserate about writing, and generally share our lives. Writing is very solitary and so having support is extremely important.

What are the most important magazines for writers to subscribe to?

I think every writer should get Publisher’s Lunch, a daily emailed newsletter that is great for following the industry. I also like Poets & Writers, Writers Digest, and Jane Freeman’s blog.


Gina L. Mulligan began her writing career over twenty years ago as a freelance journalist for national magazines. Her short stories have appeared in Star 82 Review and Storyacious, were performed at Stories on Stage Sacramento, and were included in the anthologies Tudor Close: A Collection of Mystery Stories and Not Your Mother’s Book…on Dogs. She’s won awards from the Abilene Writers Guild, San Francisco LitQuake, and the Soul-Making Keats Literary Competition.

After her own diagnosis, Gina founded Girls Love Mail, a charity that collects handwritten letters of encouragement for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. She was honored for her charitable work on the nationally syndicated talk show The Steve Harvey Show.

Publications – Novels       
Remember the Ladies – May 2016
From Across the Room – September 2016

Publications – Short Stories & Anthologies        
The Slingback – Performed Stories on Stage
Stop Thief! – Not Your Mother’s Book on Dogs Anthology
Webb of Lies – Tudor Close: A Collection of Mystery Stories
The Gadabout – Storyacious.com
Sub Night – 82 Star Review

To learn more about Gina, please visit her website.

Author Interview – Patty Blue Hayes

How did publishing your first book change your process of writing?

When I wrote my first book I wasn’t aware of these magical beings known as developmental editors. I thought I’d find an editor to correct grammar and make note of things I might have repeated, were too confusing or could be worded differently. Each time I sat down to edit I always started at page one. So pages one through fifty were extremely over-edited and the last ten pages were pretty neglected. It wasn’t until I found my editor, Chelsea, that I realized what a gift her work was to my book. My first book was a published journal. And was a very personal story. I had no idea if my experience had a traditional story arc or theme or even what was necessary to keep in the manuscript or delete. Working with my editor taught me that it’s essential to work with a developmental editor before I begin my editing and polishing process.

For my upcoming book I have rough journal entries and will craft the book after my collaboration with an editor. I also learned not to make every word dramatic and perfect. A published journal should read realistically, more conversational in nature and not overly precise or extravagant.

How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

Currently I’m working on the journal-book from three international volunteer trips I completed in 2017. I have one spiritual/healing book outlined and have post-its covering my office door. A cook book is only meagerly in the works on paper but very clear in my mind thematically and a 10,000 word eBook on preparing for travel to Thailand is more than half finished.

Do you view writing as a kind of spiritual practice? Why or why not?

Absolutely, yes. Writing is not an option for me. I believe I’ve finally come to realize it is what I am meant to do. If I don’t write, I become moody, anxious and stressed. I was eleven years-old when I stated I wanted to write a book. And specifically, I wanted to write one that would help adults. But at eleven, that seemed a bit unrealistic. I started writing in a journal in high school and went on to write in college but never saw it as something I could really do as an avocation.

After my mother died I wrote my first screenplay. I wrote another screenplay, because that’s what you do the minute you finish the first one. I got very discouraged after my agent disappeared. It had taken me a long time to even get an agent. So I stopped writing but always had the longing. It wasn’t until the day I was flying back home alone after my husband told me he didn’t want to be married to me anymore that a definitive thought came to me, pick up a pen, this is your first book. And that book is helping adults.

For me, writing is as essential as breathing. And I believe it is what I’m here to do. Not paint, not cook, not play an instrument. By writing, I’m honoring the most authentic part of myself and allowing my soul to express itself.

How many hours a day do you write?

I don’t write daily. In the process of the current book, I wrote journal entries almost daily but I wasn’t putting myself on a schedule to write every day. As I approach the re-writing and editing process I may spend four to six hours at a time engaged in the work, but that won’t likely be daily. I’ve also found it essential for me to take breaks from writing. My writing process is organic. Maybe I could produce more if I scheduled time every day, but I don’t think the writing would flow.

What are your favorite literary journals?

I don’t actually read any literary journals.

What is the most difficult part of your creative process?

I’d say the most challenging part on this current book will be to decide what to omit. And that’s why working with an editor I trust will be so valuable.When you write something so personal, it can be a challenge to distance ourselves from the experience. I used to have a hard time editing, but now I settle in my writing chair with tea, light some incense, and I offer up a little prayer for guidance and then I trust in that process. I may go back and edit like that several times, and each time I’m trusting the process and asking the ego to step aside.

Do you believe in writer’s block? Why or why not?

I believe people experience writer’s block. If I wrote fiction I know I’d have writer’s block. That genre seems so foreign to me. I wouldn’t know where to begin! I haven’t experienced writer’s block but that may be due to my loose schedule and not putting pressure on myself to produce.

How long on average does it take you to write a book?

This varies greatly. My first book sat for a few years before I could even start re-writing and editing due to the emotionally triggering content. I was still going through the healing process and sometimes reading my words was too overwhelming and not good for my mental health. That book began in 2010 and was published in 2015. My current journal book started in 2017 and I’d like to publish by 2019.

What other authors are you friends with, and how do they help you become a better writer?

I’m in a local writer’s group here on the Central Coast in California. Because writing is a solitary process, I enjoy meeting up with them. I learn a lot from our meetings and it’s encouraging to hear people’s good news about getting published, completing a project, winning an award or getting a book deal. I have a confession. Because I write in the journal/memoir genre, I can’t read other authors in the genre too close to when I’m going to be writing and editing. I need to keep myself clear from developing comparison-itits. I mostly read self-help, spiritual and personal development books.

What are the most important magazines for writers to subscribe to?

That’s a great question! I can’t wait to read other writer’s answers. I’m currently in a cycle where I’m not watching or reading any content on marketing, blogging or anything to do with the business of writing. In the past I’ve overdone it on watching videos and webinars, most of which are sales tools designed to have you purchase a more expensive product or service. It was getting to be more of a cause of stress than a benefit.


Works by Patty Blue Hayes

My Heart is Broken, Now What?

Patty Blue Hayes is grateful to have survived her near death divorce, an event that launched her into the darkest depths of depression. Patty’s award-winning book, Wine, Sex and Suicide – My Near Death Divorce, shares her story of loss, vulnerability, and eventual reawakening to her own value and worth. She moved from pain to finding purpose. Through her story she helps people not feel alone in their own painful life experiences.

Patty founded Soul Garden Healing®, to help women get through their journey of heartbreak with her signature audio program, You Can Heal Your Heartbreak™.The program is based on her book, My Heart is Broken. Now What?, offering 12 helpful practices in an easy guidebook.

She is working on another life experience book, chronicling time in Thailand at an elephant sanctuary, the Dominican Republic, where she worked at a boys and girls club, and her return to the small Romanian village of Baile Tusnad to complete her English teaching practicum to children in a group home. Follow her journey on her blog.

Learn more about Patty at her website: www.pattybluehayes.com